A City That Works For Everyone: Reflections on the Necessity of an Intersectional Urbanism

In the last few weeks, people have been discussing the issue of diversity in urbanism. At the recent CanU conference, there was an all-white all-male panel that got people talking. What happened at CanU isn't uncommon; many urbanist conferences often have a lack of gender and racial diversity in their speaker and panel rosters. So, … Continue reading A City That Works For Everyone: Reflections on the Necessity of an Intersectional Urbanism

Unsafe at the intersection: Racism, road rage and the role of urban design

A few weeks ago, while biking to the University of Waterloo (as I do every day), I had a jarring altercation with a motorist. I use the Spurline Trail, which is a lovely bike path that connects Downtown Kitchener and Uptown Waterloo. The path is well taken care of. It is beautifully lit, which recognizes … Continue reading Unsafe at the intersection: Racism, road rage and the role of urban design

Design Thinking and the City: Dignity Lies in the Details

Last winter I had an experience that changed the way I saw urban design. It was mid-February. It was one of those days that was so cold that the city seemed to be blanketed in a mist of ice. Certainly not a day one wanted to spend outside for too long. I was on my … Continue reading Design Thinking and the City: Dignity Lies in the Details

Towards an Inclusive Edmonton: How can we go about having a meaningful and productive conversation about racism?

I've always been acutely aware of the colour of my skin - save for a few childhood trips to India, where I "blended in". Even then, I was contemplating my identity as a Canadian Indian kid and I knew that I still had not found my place of belonging. As a child, I can remember … Continue reading Towards an Inclusive Edmonton: How can we go about having a meaningful and productive conversation about racism?