A City That Works For Everyone: Reflections on the Necessity of an Intersectional Urbanism

In the last few weeks, people have been discussing the issue of diversity in urbanism. At the recent CanU conference, there was an all-white all-male panel that got people talking. What happened at CanU isn't uncommon; many urbanist conferences often have a lack of gender and racial diversity in their speaker and panel rosters. So, … Continue reading A City That Works For Everyone: Reflections on the Necessity of an Intersectional Urbanism

More Than Books: Libraries as Catalysts for Healthy Urban Transformation

Over the past few months, I've had the honour to serve as Guest Librarian with the Kitchener Public Library. Guest Librarians are invited by KPL to bring new ideas and to act as ambassadors for the library within their communities. During my tenure, I chose to focus on healthy cities. Specifically, how we as citizens … Continue reading More Than Books: Libraries as Catalysts for Healthy Urban Transformation

Put Yourself In Our Shoes: Using Empathy to Build Walkable Cities

About a year ago, I wrote a post about how urban design can impact a person's sense of dignity. The issue has been on my mind regularly since. I think about it every day, actually. My research involves understanding how people perceive urban environments. A study I wrapped up this semester examined how being in the presence … Continue reading Put Yourself In Our Shoes: Using Empathy to Build Walkable Cities

Unsafe at the intersection: Racism, road rage and the role of urban design

A few weeks ago, while biking to the University of Waterloo (as I do every day), I had a jarring altercation with a motorist. I use the Spurline Trail, which is a lovely bike path that connects Downtown Kitchener and Uptown Waterloo. The path is well taken care of. It is beautifully lit, which recognizes … Continue reading Unsafe at the intersection: Racism, road rage and the role of urban design

Design Thinking and the City: Dignity Lies in the Details

Last winter I had an experience that changed the way I saw urban design. It was mid-February. It was one of those days that was so cold that the city seemed to be blanketed in a mist of ice. Certainly not a day one wanted to spend outside for too long. I was on my … Continue reading Design Thinking and the City: Dignity Lies in the Details